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"If you can dream it, you can do it." — Walt Disney

I'm an art student with a blog and a passion.

directedbychuckjones:

The Coyote (Hungrii Fea Bagius) chases the Road Runner (Tidbittius Velocitus). 
Academy Award-nominee for best short animated film of 1961, “Beep Prepared” was directed by Chuck Jones. This is a layout drawing, graphite on 12 field animation paper, 10.5” x 12.5”. 

directedbychuckjones:

The Coyote (Hungrii Fea Bagius) chases the Road Runner (Tidbittius Velocitus). 

Academy Award-nominee for best short animated film of 1961, “Beep Prepared” was directed by Chuck Jones. This is a layout drawing, graphite on 12 field animation paper, 10.5” x 12.5”. 

— 5 days ago with 158 notes
#animation  #production art  #Chuck Jones  #The Looney Tunes  #drawing 
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips — Asymmetry in facial expressions.

A lot of times, asymmetry will bring energy and movement to a pose or composition. More specifically, I feel like breaking the symmetry of a character’s expression is key to bring interest to it. Of course, there’s always a situation where there’s a need for symmetry. On top of my head, I can think of depicting a character who has an authority role, or the “undefeated champion of something”, or the “cold stone killer”, etc. So, a symmetrical facial expression usually means the character is: supremely bored, supremely confident, has no emotions, has a poker face, or is dead. Did I miss one? Symmetry in framing is also quite rare, but when handled by a master (Kubrick, Anderson), it’s undeniable. (If you have time, watch this: http://vimeo.com/89302848)

Now, back to asymmetry in facial expressions. In general, it’s a great way to flesh out a character’s thought process. What is he/she thinking about? What’s their goal?

I’m just touching the tip of the iceberg here. Way more tips to come in the future. Maybe next time, I’ll start to cover GESTURES.

Completely unrelated to the subject, I recently read a list of tips from movie director Sam Mendes. Here’s my favorite: “Try to learn to make the familiar strange, and the strange familiar. …”

Norm

— 3 weeks ago with 6838 notes
#art tips  #expressions  #drawing 

Milt animated this scene, in which Edgar celebrates with a cigar and a bottle of champagne.

The way he casually lifts up the bottle, lets it twirl in the air before adjusting his grip is fantastic. - Andreas Deja

— 1 month ago with 284 notes
#animation  #production art  #Disney  #The Aristocats  #drawing  #Milt Kahl 

"Melody first my dear, and THEN the lyrics."

So many graphic lines are directed toward the main business of Roger’s finger touching Anita’s nose. Her long neck, the lines in her hair and the curve of her nose clearly point to the subtle contact about to happen. Roger’s whole body leans forward toward Anita’s face, and every line, from folds in the fabric to his basic anatomy, leads the viewer’s eye to the specific area of interest. via Deja View

— 2 months ago with 1286 notes
#animation  #production art  #Disney  #101 Dalmatians  #drawing  #Milt Kahl